Indoor Air Quality Solutions Blog

"Healthier Air Starts Here" (407) 383-9459


Indoor Air Quality IAQ Blog





Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Insulation Nuisance Odor Investigations

IAQSWith the rapid increase in the “Green” movement and the push for more energy efficient homes spray polyurethane foam SPF insulation is growing substantially.  As with most new building products the industry has had its own set of unique challenges that include the recognized need for training and certification for installers. Along with the recognized need for training are the results of inadequate applicator training, nuisance odors and occupant sensitivity.  These occupant related complaints have led to a rise in SPF insulation investigations by many who have little understanding of SPF insulation and how it can alter the indoor environment even when correctly installed.


When it comes to the investigation of nuisance odors associated with the application of spray polyurethane foam SPF insulation, I’ve found that most of the investigations typically involve little more than varied attempts at trying to chemically associate the odor with the off-gassing of the SPF.


I’ve been assessing spray polyurethane foam insulation SPF for several years on too many properties to list. I’ve assessed a dozen or so product lines both closed and open cell for manufactures, builders, homeowners, and applicators. The properties ranged from universities, community centers, offices, homes, both new construction and retrofit applications.


In my experience, SPF investigations can be categorized in three distinct categories. The first two seem to be the primary areas of SPFI investigations. The first category is simply miss-applied SPF, the second is presence of pre-existing or recently introduced contaminants and the third would be occupant exposure and sensitization during SPF application.


By using these three assessment categories, I have had great luck in identifying the catalyst of the odor and associated complaint.  It has also helped raise awareness that it’s not always the SPF.


The first category – Category 1 Miss-applied SPF Insulation category


These nuisance odors are directly associated with incorrectly applied SPF insulation and can be addressed by either correcting the areas of miss-applied foam or by removing and re-insulating the areas. Miss-Applied includes improper ventilation during the application, incomplete application, off ratio application, and also includes the SPF in direct contact with recessed can lights in the attic, keyless light fixtures bulbs, dryer vents, and/or chimney flues, all of which can heat the SPF and cause a tremendous amount of chemical odors.


Category 1 is relatively cut and dry and requires the onsite inspection of the SPF and the collection of no air samples.  The inspection of the foam and the determination of correct and complete installation is a critical first step.


I‘ve been on SPF insulation investigations where other Indoor Environmental Professionals (IEP’s) who were hired to assess the SPF insulation never looked at the SPF insulation.  Most have no knowledge of how to assess the correct or complete installation of the SPF insulation.  Most IEP’s show up with all manner of air sampling equipment and begin and end their investigation with the collection of air samples intending to identify the chemical signature of miss-applied SPF insulation.  But that’s just not going to happen.


For all who want to conduct SPF insulation inspections, start with understanding what correct and complete installation is according to the manufacturer who produced the foam you are inspecting.


Below is an example of a home with retro-fit SPF insulation installed in the attic.  The homeowners hired an IEP to help establish and/or confirm that the SPF insulation was making them sick.  The home was traditionally ventilated with a large rear lanai.   As with typical SPF insulation landscape fabric was used to separate the lanai attic from the sealed SPF insulation attic.  However, the large Lanai attic space was not properly ventilated as shown in Diagram 1.

IAQS  #IAQS

The lanai had soffit vents and no off ridge vents hence the incomplete attic ventilation.  The outdoor air pressure (wind) was moving the hot humid Florida air into the attic and into the sealed SPF insulation attic through the landscape fabric and SPF insulation as shown in Diagram 3.  The moisture was supporting microbial growth that was the actual odor identified within the home.  The correction was to first relieve the lanai attic pressure by installing an off ridge vent as shown in Diagram 2 and then by removing and replacing the mold damaged SPF insulation.

IAQS

Unfortunately, thousands of dollars were spent on the hunt for the infamous miss-applied chemical signature of the off-gassing SPF insulation.  Of course to no avail.  This is just one example of the easily overlooked yet painfully obvious issues with incomplete or incorrect SPF insulation.

The second category – Category 2 pre-existing or recently introduced contributors


This category cannot be stress enough to the professionals that are investigating SPFI.  This category runs the gamut and can include some rather odd contributors to occupant discomfort and nuisance odors that become much more concentrated when the SPFI is installed.   These include the HVAC system, air exchange rate, storage of materials in the now sealed space, insect and or rodent activity, routine pest control applications, the previous insulation condition and material, proper ducting of kitchen and bath fans.  The possibilities are endless and all must be considered.  Remember that what has accumulated in the attic is now semi-conditioned air that is shared with the attic and living space of the home.


For example if the home is a 60 year old ranch that had open cell SPFI installed at the roof sheathing and the attic was not cleaned to help save a few bucks, the bath fans are ducted to the attic space, and the home once had a rodent issue that was treated with poisons.  Well to say the least you have a huge list of contributors to occupant discomfort and nuisance odors.  Most of the SPF insulation investigations I am called in to review all of these issues were overlooked simply because of the recent application of SPFI.


It’s not necessarily the SPF insulation that is producing the odor or contaminate that is causing occupant discomfort but the SPF insulation is what eliminated the natural ventilation of the attic which prevented the odors and contaminants from entering the home.  The SPF insulation has now trapped the odors and contaminants within the semi-conditioned space.


In this case, the home also had no outdoor air and the home was accumulating VOC’s from daily use products.


The home was blower-door tested and didn’t even come close to the minimum ASHRAE air exchange rate. That attic air is now a part of the occupied space as semi-conditioned space and has 60 years of accumulated who knows what.  Easily it could include the accumulation of dust, debris, fiberglass, rodent and insect activity, prior application of pesticides, maybe even vermiculite.


This is a huge aspect of an SPF insulation investigation that I find all too often overlooked. As a professional investigating SPF insulation you have to ask questions beyond the obvious who was the demon SPF insulation manufacturer.


You have to ask relevant questions such as;

  • “What is the condition of the new semi-conditioned space?”
  • “What have the occupants been sealed in with?”
  • “How is the air exchange rate being met?”
  • “How is the semi-conditioned space actually being semi-conditioned?”


Sometimes it’s best to keep it simple, particles, pathway, and pressure.  Remember to keep an opened mind; it’s not always the SPF insulation.


On a retrofit SPF insulation investigation where there was an odor described as rotten eggs or sulfur the home owner hired an IEP to help establish that the SPF insulation was making them sick.  The IEP’s hired to find the odor focused on TO-15 sample collection throughout the home.  They were confident they identified the miss-applied SPF insulation chemical signature.


Not quite. Just under $5,000 later it was determined that the samples identified a chemical cocktail that could have been the result of just about everything used within the home over the last year since the SPF insulation was applied.  With no outdoor air supply and poor ventilation the VOC’s created within the home stayed in the home.  What the IEP’s didn’t notice was a failed air admittance valve in the attic over the area where the odor was the strongest.  At a cost of twenty bucks for a new air admittance valve the odor was eliminated.


On a new construction SPF insulation investigation, the IEP’s hired to establish that the SPF insulation was making the homeowners sick once again set up the VOC sample collection center and collected four TO-15 8 hour summa canisters and 8 sorbent tubes from a single story 2,200 square foot home.


The homeowners reported that after about a year the home began to make them feel worse when home than when away.  The culprit in their mind was the SPF insulation.  When I asked them how they came to that conclusion they said Google. They then hire an IEP to help them prove to the builder that the SPF insulation was making them sick.


As the IEP was setting up their summa canisters, I began my investigation that started with the condition and settings of the homes ventilation system.  I knew the home had outdoor air supply.  I simply wanted to determine the thermostat and Aprilaire settings and establish the amount of outdoor air being supplied to the home.  As shown in the photo the Aprilaire ventilation controller was set to “Off”.

IAQS

When the 8 hour sampling period was over and the IEP was collecting their equipment I cranked up the AC and opened the Aprilaire ventilator to 30 minutes per cycle. During the sampling period of 8 hours the carbon dioxide levels were measured above 2000 ppm and the tVOC’s were measured at a mere 700 to 800 ppb.  After 1 hour of proper ventilation the carbon dioxide and tVOC levels were reduced by more than 50%. Amazingly the issue proved to be accumulation and not production of VOC’s.  Once again a complete investigation identified an issue with the ventilation that was misdiagnosed as SPF insulation.


On another SPF insulation investigation were the homeowner had spent thousands on sampling with an IEP who felt he had established the connection between the SPF and the occupant symptoms.  Again review by the PhD’s and chemist found no such connection that could be corroborated.  However the interview found that the homeowner was in the second floor master bedroom during the application of the SPF insulation.  The access to the attic was in the master closet, nice.  The applicator didn’t want to use landscape fabric to separate the large covered second story balcony just outside of the master bedroom so the applicator just applied the SPF insulation to the ceiling of the balcony.

IAQS

The photos above show two of the nine recessed can light fixtures that were covered in the foam from completely covered to just shy of completely covered.  The homeowner liked to sit outside in the evening and look out over the lake.  However, he reported that he could no longer spend the evenings on his beloved balcony because he was so sensitive to the SPF insulation. Yes he had become sensitized to the SPF insulation because he was in the home during the application but the trigger or catalyst to the odor was the heating of the SPF insulation just outside his master bedroom and just above his beloved balcony each time he turned on the balcony lights.


Sometimes as IEP’s we are hired to provide a very specific service.  I’ll use mold as an example.  When some IEP’s are hired to provide a mold inspection they often become far too focused on looking for one potential contributor and often overlook the many other and often obvious contributors.  Samples for mold spores are collected and moisture is hunted with a vengeance but not much else is looked at or investigated.   SPF insulation investigations are the same.  Are we hired to help the homeowner identify what in their home may be contributing to their symptoms or are we there to prove their hypothesis that it is or isn’t mold or SPF insulation.


IEP’s often go in with blinders on and lose focus on the true intent of the investigation which in my opinion should be “What is contributing to occupant discomfort and complaint?”   The IEP should approach the home as a system and be open to all potential contributors to occupant complaint.  The chief characteristic that distinguishes the scientific method of investigation from other methods of investigation is that scientists seek to let reality speak for itself, supporting a theory when a theory’s predictions are confirmed and challenging a theory when its predictions prove false.  Scientific investigation is generally intended to be as objective as possible in order to reduce biased interpretations of results. This is often overlooked when the IEP conducts an investigation focused on making the evidence support their hypothesis without objective challenge.


IEP’s must remember that while the SPF insulation may be the issue unless you can say there are no other issues within the home you have not completed your investigation you have just begun.


The third category – Category 3 Sensitization due to exposure


This category includes all occupants who have become sensitized or allergic to the odors given off from SPFI. With sensitization occupants have either re-entered the property shortly after the foam is applied, well before the manufacturer recommended re-occupancy time of 24 to 48 hours while the SPF insulation is still curing and off-gassing, or in the most severe cases of occupant sensitivity the exposure was actually took place during the application of the SPF insulation.


I had one case where the sensitized occupant was also the general contractor that built the home.  During the interview with the owner builder, I asked what he knew as a builder about the SPF insulation.  He admitted to not knowing anything until he began to react to the SPF insulation in his home.  I asked if he had the MSDS to review and he informed me that he did not.  Interesting, I asked if he maintained all of the building material MDS onsite.  He happily sad no that’s up to the subcontractors, interesting.


I then asked him if he was curious as to how the SPF insulation was applied and he of course told me that he was very curious.  He told me that he was in the attic while it was being applied.  Incredible right, you can’t make this up.


I asked if he thought it was odd that the applicator was in full protective equipment with supplied air and he was just watching in street clothes.  I also asked if the contractor told him that he shouldn’t be watching without personal protective equipment.  He told me that the contractor told him that he shouldn’t be up there when it was being applied but it was his house and he was the builder so he was going to do what he wanted.  I asked how long he was up there and he said about 30 minutes and then he began to get a huge headache.  Unbelievable, he was incredibly sensitized to the foam and no amount of miss-applied SPF insulation removal was going to provide him any relief.


Sensitization of the occupants can be a result of many issues such as occupants that don’t want to spend the money for a hotel stay, early re-entry or occupancy, the curious application observer, to the painfully stupid like the builder above.  However occupant sensitization can also be the result of the lack of proper ventilation during the application.  Venting of the off-gassing of the SPF insulation during application is critical and often not conducted at all. In all cases of occupant sensitization that I have been involved with the SPF insulation application was not properly vented to the exterior which created a substantial accumulation of the off-gassing chemicals within the property. These trapped volatile organic chemicals VOC’s are what sensitizes the occupants who have either re-occupied too early or were present during the SPFI application.


Sensitization occurs when the occupants are overexposed to the trapped volatile organic chemicals VOC’s and become sensitized. From that point on, any exposure to even a minute amount of the chemical causes a reaction. The process of sensitization can make a home unlivable for people who become sensitized.


Homes that have improper ventilation during the application process of the SPF insulation are also included in the miss-applied category and almost always have identified areas of miss-applied SPF insulation (SPFI).


This category is unique in that any attempt at reducing the occupant’s exposure to the SPF insulation that they are now sensitized to may not be of any relief.  I have had no luck in providing sensitized occupants relief from the home they are now sensitive to.  I have been involved in everything from the introduction of outdoor air through a pre-filter and dehumidifier to control the temperature, humidity, particles, path, and pressure to full removal of the SPF insulation. Unfortunately that bell can’t be un-rung.


Steps in the Right Direction


SPFA’s The Spray Polyurethane Foam Professional Certification Program (“SPFA PCP”) launched at the SprayFoam 2013 Convention & Expo

IAQS

To become certified under SPFA’s new program, you must pass the exam and meet the criteria for any level of Certification you would like to achieve. It is a progressive program with each level based on the candidate passing the exam for the previous level. In other words, EVERYONE must begin with SPF Assistant criteria. If your ultimate goal is to be a Certified Project Manager, you must meet the requirements for Assistant, then Installer, then Master Installer, then Project Manager to become a Certified SPF Project Manager. http://www.sprayfoam.org/


Connecticut House Bill No. 5908; An act requiring safety and certification standards for the spray foam insulation industry


ASTM WK30960 is intended to establish safe re-entry times for occupants following spray polyurethane foam insulation application.


ASTM WK30960 - New Practice for Spraying, Sampling, and Packaging Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Insulation Samples for Environmental Chamber Emissions Testing


The CAN/ULC S705.1 National Standard requires that the spray polyurethane foam material be installed in accordance with the CAN/ULC S705.2 standard for Thermal insulation – Spray applied rigid polyurethane foam, medium density – Application.


The CAN/ULC S705.2 Application Standard lists a number of requirements for the manufacturer (seller of the two liquid components), the contractor (the corporation who has the contract to perform the installation) and the installer (the worker who actually sprays the components to form spray polyurethane foam on the job site).


The CAN/ULC S705.2 Application Standard sets forth requirements for environmental conditions suitable for spraying, substrate requirements, installation requirements, daily testing of the installed products and documentation requirements.


The Licensed Contractor is required to use applicators that are trained and certified under the SPF Quality Assurance Program used by CUFCA. Each installer is issued a plastic photo-identification card every July 1. The installer is required to carry this card with him during the complete installation period.



John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
Indoor Air Quality Solutions, IAQS
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
Certification by American Council for Accredited Certification ACAC CIEC #0711048
Council-certified Environmental Thermography Consultant ACAC CETC #1005013
Accreditation by Council for Engineering and Scientific Specialty Boards (CESB)
Florida State License Mold Assessor MRSA #4

www.FloridaIAQ.com



 

Add a Comment

(Enter the numbers shown in the above image)


Follow jlapotaire on Twitter


Review microshield-es.com on alexa.com
   

[Valid RSS]
Add this Content to Your Site
   


Latest Top (12) News


EPISODE461 - FLASHBACK FRIDAY! Richard Corsi, PhD. of Texas, Austin
This week we flashback to a show from 9-26-14 with Richard Corsi, PhD. We had a great series with Dr. Corsi and several of his students. We called the series Research to Practice. This show set up the next three we did with him and his students. It was a great discussion of the challenges and opportunitiescoming for the IAQ world. Richard Corsi, PhD is the Chair & ECH Bantel Professor for Professional Practice Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. He earned his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of California at Davis in 1989. He joined the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin in 1994. Dr. Corsi researches indoor air quality, including sources and control of indoor air pollution and human exposure to indoor toxins. He has also studied how architectural materials can remove chemicals from building air, offering protection for occupants following terrorist attacks.

Fri, 26 May 2017 12:00:12 -0400


EPISODE460 - Rachel Gutter - What is a WELL Building Standard?
This week on IAQ Radio we welcome Rachel Gutter, Chief Product Officer for the International WELL Building Institute. Ms. Gutter joined the International WELL Building Institute in late 2016 as senior vice president, bringing with her a wealth of cross-cutting experience in safer, healthier environments where they matter the most: in school rooms across the globe. She joins IWBI after a nine-year career at the U.S. Green Building Council, where she founded the Center for Green Schools, convening and collaborating with a diverse group of partners, including teachers unions, the National PTA, the Department of Education, the Princeton Review, executives from Fortune 100 companies, and green building councils around the world. Under her direction, the Center published more than 1,000 pages of technical guides and original research, mobilized more than $275 billion in investments in LEED certified educational facilities, and deployed more than half a million volunteers to contribute $50 million in donated time to transform schools and campuses on every continent. In her current role she is helping the International WELL Building Institute continue their development and implementation of the WELL Building Standards. According to the Institute this is the first standard of its kind that focuses solely on the health and wellness of building occupants. WELL identifies 100 performance metrics, design strategies, and policies that can be implemented by the owners, designers, engineers, contractors, users and operators of a building. It is based on a thorough review of the existing research on the effects of spaces on individuals and has been advanced through a thorough scientific and technical review. In order to achieve the requirements of the WELL Building Standard, the space must undergo a process that includes an on-site assessment and performance testing by a third party. Overall, the WELL Building Standard is designed to comprehensively cover the various individual needs of building occupants while also building a common foundation for measuring wellness in the built environment.

Fri, 19 May 2017 11:59:42 -0400


EPISODE459 - FLASHBACK FRIDAY - Episode 435 - William Fisk
This week we flashback to a show from 10-28-16 with William Fisk. This is an interview we have been trying to line up for quite some time and its exciting to have this research giant join us live for the hour. Few have contributed as much to our knowledge of IAQ as Bill and his group at LBL. We look forward to discussing how that research can be better used in practice with the Leader of the LBL Indoor Environment Group. Mr. Fisk is a Sr. Scientist (mechanical engineer) and is the leader of the Indoor Environment Group. He has more than 30 years of experience in research on the interrelated issues of building energy performance, ventilation, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and occupant health and performance. His research focuses primarily on energy efficient methods of maintaining and improving ventilation and IEQ in commercial buildings and on quantifying the impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He is a fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the Academy of Indoor Air Sciences, and he serves on the editorial board for Indoor Air Journal. He is an author of approximately 100 refereed archival journal articles or book chapters. He has BS and MS degrees in Mechanical Engineering.

Fri, 12 May 2017 12:01:24 -0400


EPISODE458 - Ed Light - EnLightening New AIHA White Paper on VOC Criteria
Mr. Light holds degrees in Environmental Science from the University of Massachusetts (B.S.) and Marshall University (M.S.), is a Senior Fellow of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, has authored over 40 scientific publications on assessment and control of the indoor environment and has chaired several national scientific committees. In the 1980s, Ed established the West Virginia Department of Health IAQ Program, pioneering efforts to resolve exposure issues related to formaldehyde, asbestos, and termiticides. In the 1990s, he developed widely used protocols for addressing IEQ complaints (published by EPA, NIOSH and ISIAQ) and managing air quality in occupied buildings under construction (for SMACNA, promulgated by ANSI). As a consultant, Ed has directed more than 1000 multi-disciplinary IEQ investigations, ranging from the White House to the South Pole Station. He has been admitted in numerous proceedings as a litigation expert in industrial hygiene.

Fri, 05 May 2017 12:00:03 -0400


EPISODE000 - IICRC Show Cancelled with Pete Duncanson


Fri, 28 Apr 2017 12:00:26 -0400


EPISODE457- Ellen R Tohn - Tohn Environmental Strategies
This week IAQ Radio welcomes Ellen Tohn of Tohn Environmental Strategies. Ms. Tohn is an environmental health consultant with over 30 years of experience. She is a nationally recognized expert in housing based environmental health threats, green and healthy housing, and indoor air quality. Ms. Tohn works with housing developers, owners and managers to create green and healthy housing and developed the nationally recognized â??One Touchâ?? approach. She has assisted health advocates catalyze policy solutions; designed energy efficiency programs incorporating health protections; and managed environmental health research studies. Ms. Tohn served as an advisor on health issues to the US Green Building Councilâ??s LEED program, Enterprise Green Communities, Delos Living, EPA, Department of Energy, Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), and numerous green building programs. Ms. Tohn is a nationally recognized trainer, providing professional development to over 7,000 individuals. She received her BA from Cornell University and a Masters from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Ms. Tohn is also an Assistant Professor of Practice at the Brown School of Public Health. Home Performance professionals are becoming much more focused on indoor air quality and that focus is a game changer for their industry and possibly the IAQ world.

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 12:00:12 -0400


EPISODE456 - Ken Larsen, Ed Cross JD, Peter Crosa, Pete Consigli - TPA
This week on IAQradio we welcome an All Star cast for a frank discussion on the future of the restoration industry. Our guests were all speakers at last week's 71st International Restoration Convention and Industry Expo in Palm Springs, CA. They all gave important presentations or Keynotes at the Restoration Industry Association's (RIA) annual event. The Town Hall theme for this year's event was "The Future of the Water Damage Restoration Industry" and was facilitated by none other than IAQradio's Restoration Global Watchdog Pete Consigli! The Town Hall was the culmination of one of RIA's convention story line's that included a breakout session moderated by Ken Larsen on the Do's and Don'ts of Rebates, Referral Fees, Comps and Gratuities with Peter Crosa and well known IAQ attorney Michael Bowdoin. Ed Cross was the convention's Day 2 keynote speaker and addressed the RIA members on "The 6 New Legal Points Restorers must Understand to Survive in 2017". Crosa who is the sitting President for the National Association of Independent Insurance Adjusters (NAIIA) presented the Independent Adjusters viewpoint on the Town Hall Panel. Well known industry advocate Ed Cross aka "The Restoration Lawyer" made his case for industry unification through one voice and closed out his Town Hall panel presentation with a message to band together, "Band or Burn" was the reoccurring message! The RTPE program (Registered Third Party Evaluator) recently explained to RIA members at their annual convention in Palm Springs during their Town Hall meeting by Ken Larsen, CR, WLS, CMP may be a solution for contractors who are constantly challenged by TPA's on their scope of work and invoices. Longtime industry activist and RIA supporter Ken Larsen presented his vision for the RTPE program on the RIA Town Hall panel along with Peter Crosa, AIC, RPA and Ed Cross, Esq. Larsen has a 5 part series on the TPE concept that was previewed in the 2017 February issue of Cleaning and Restoration (C&R) magazine. A high point of the RIA annual banquet and awards ceremony was the presentation of C&R's Golden Quill award won this year by IAQradio's own, Cliff "The Z-man" Zlotnik for his article on "Concerns over the Water Restoration Industry". The culmination of the ceremony was the awarding of the association's most prestigious honor, the presentation of the Martin L. King award. The 32nd annual recipient of the Marty King award was Ken Larsen for his years of service and activism to RIA and the industry! Way to go Ken!!

Fri, 14 Apr 2017 11:59:50 -0400


EPISODE455 - Christine Oliver, M.D. - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston
This week we welcome Christine Oliver, MD to the show. Dr. Oliver is President of Occupational Health Initiatives, Inc. in Brookline, MA. She is an Associate Physician in the Department of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Division) at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Board certified in occupational medicine and in internal medicine, Dr. Oliver's primary specialty is Occupational and Environmental Medicine, with an emphasis on occupational and environmental lung disease. At the MGH she evaluates and cares for patients with occupational and environmental illness and disease, including occupational asthma, interstitial lung disease, building-related health problems, and chemical sensitivities. Dr. Oliver has done research and published in the area of occupational lung disease and she has testified before the United States Congress with regard to work-related health issues and risks. For the past three decades an important focus of Dr. Oliver's consulting work has been indoor air quality and related health effects. She has lectured and published on this subject and she has been actively involved in indoor air quality assessments in a variety of settings. These include health care facilities, courthouses and other government buildings, schools, and commercial office buildings. Together with industrial hygienists, engineers, and human systems specialists she has worked to identify, characterize, and resolve air quality problems and their related health effects. In 2009 she was a participant and presenter in the ASTM Johnson Conference on the standardization of mold response procedures. An important component of Dr. Oliver's clinical work has been in the area of fragrances and their related health effects, including causation and/or exacerbation of chemical sensitivities. She has lectured on these topics, counseled patients and their families with regard to steps that can be taken to identify and remove fragranced products from their environment, and advocated for a fragrance-free policy in the clinic in which she works

Fri, 07 Apr 2017 12:00:18 -0400


EPISODE454 - John & Lydia Lapotaire -IAQ Solutions & IAQA Presidential Coup
This week on IAQ Radio we welcome John and Lydia Lapotaire. John, together with his wife Lydia, has owned and operated Orlando Florida based Indoor Air Quality Solutions since 2001. John is a Building Envelope & Indoor Environment Consultant specializing in building product failure investigations, forensic water intrusion investigations, and building envelope failure investigations for commercial and residential structures. John and Lydia also provide indoor environmental assessments and mold & odor investigations. John is also the current President of the Indoor Air Quality Association. John and Lydia are Florida Licensed Mold Assessors, Certified Indoor Environmental Consultants CIEC's. They have performed investigations, and forensic diagnostic inspections throughout the mid-West and Eastern United States for both commercial and residential properties. John has served as an expert witness in court cases involving indoor air quality, mold, building envelope failure, building product failure and spray polyurethane foam insulation. He has provided consultation and or testimony in several hundred litigation cases.

Fri, 31 Mar 2017 11:59:45 -0400


EPISODE453 - Tiina Reponan, PhD -Microbiology of the Built Environment
This week we are very happy to welcome Tiina Reponen, PhD to IAQ Radio. Dr. Reponen is a Professor in the Department of Environmental Health, College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati. As an expert in indoor allergens and mold, she served as the principal investigator in several major laboratory and field experiments on airborne allergens, bacteria and fungi and has directed exposure assessment teams in population-based studies. Dr. Reponen is the Director of the NIOSH-funded University of Cincinnati Education and Research Center (ERC), which includes graduate programs related to occupational health from three colleges: Medicine, Nursing and Applied Science and Engineering. She is currently directing two cohort studies. One is focused on the association between indoor bioaerosol exposures and the development of children's allergy and asthma and the other is focused on the effects of green renovation on indoor air quality and occupants' health.

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:59:47 -0400


EPISODE452 - Bill Turner, MS, PE - Building Science, Energy and IAQ
This week we are thrilled to welcome William "Bill" Turner, CEO of Turner Building Science and Design, LLC. He has published and lectured extensively. Bill has 35 years of experience in the implementation of moisture, indoor air quality/HVAC evaluation, energy, and engineering HVAC/building science diagnostic program evaluations in school, commercial, health care, laboratory, residential, and industrial settings. Experience includes energy analysis, HVAC performance, occupant complaints, building science/moisture intrusion evaluations, air monitoring data collection, quality assurance, technical report preparation, forensics/expert witness, and specific recommendations for corrective action. He also contributed to the USEPA/NIOSH Indoor Air Quality Guide and has served as an adviser for several other documents. Mr. Turner works with a group of experienced mechanical engineers and building scientists whose main responsibilities involve conducting indoor air quality, HVAC, energy, and building science evaluations in complaint and non-complaint buildings. He and his staff conduct evaluations nationally and recommend appropriate mitigation/renovation as warranted. Design of corrective measures or evaluation, and design of new sustainable "green" designs are also provided. Join us and LEARN MORE today at noon eastern on IAQ Radio! Special thanks for Christy Crocker at the Maine IAQ Council for helping getting Bill on this show. You can also see him live at the MIAQC sponsored 2016 Northeast Indoor Air Quality & Energy Conference

Fri, 17 Mar 2017 11:59:39 -0400


EPISODE451 - May Dooley From the Field - The ABC's of IEQ, EMF's, Mold
This week on IAQ Radio we welcome May Dooley, Principal of EnviroHealth Consulting, Inc. of Hummelstown, PA. May started her career as a secondary science teacher prior to going into home inspection and indoor environmental health consulting in the mid 80's. She has now completed over 3,000 residential and commercial IEQ inspections in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast US. May is one of those people that never stops learning and the list of seminars, conferences and meetings she has attended is impressive. She has dealt with both routine and unusual IEQ issues and we look forward to discussing her interest in what she refers to as electrical pressure and much more. May has an MS in Secondary Science Education from Hofstra University and an MA in English from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:00:16 -0500
Follow Microshields IAQ News and Headlines Bloglines RSS Feed

Subscribe with Bloglines

 



IAQ News and Articles

Latest Top (10) News
http://recordings.talkshoe.com/rss1547.xml