Indoor Air Quality Solutions Blog

"Healthier Air Starts Here" (407) 383-9459


Indoor Air Quality IAQ Blog





Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Insulation Nuisance Odor Investigations

IAQSWith the rapid increase in the “Green” movement and the push for more energy efficient homes spray polyurethane foam SPF insulation is growing substantially.  As with most new building products the industry has had its own set of unique challenges that include the recognized need for training and certification for installers. Along with the recognized need for training are the results of inadequate applicator training, nuisance odors and occupant sensitivity.  These occupant related complaints have led to a rise in SPF insulation investigations by many who have little understanding of SPF insulation and how it can alter the indoor environment even when correctly installed.


When it comes to the investigation of nuisance odors associated with the application of spray polyurethane foam SPF insulation, I’ve found that most of the investigations typically involve little more than varied attempts at trying to chemically associate the odor with the off-gassing of the SPF.


I’ve been assessing spray polyurethane foam insulation SPF for several years on too many properties to list. I’ve assessed a dozen or so product lines both closed and open cell for manufactures, builders, homeowners, and applicators. The properties ranged from universities, community centers, offices, homes, both new construction and retrofit applications.


In my experience, SPF investigations can be categorized in three distinct categories. The first two seem to be the primary areas of SPFI investigations. The first category is simply miss-applied SPF, the second is presence of pre-existing or recently introduced contaminants and the third would be occupant exposure and sensitization during SPF application.


By using these three assessment categories, I have had great luck in identifying the catalyst of the odor and associated complaint.  It has also helped raise awareness that it’s not always the SPF.


The first category – Category 1 Miss-applied SPF Insulation category


These nuisance odors are directly associated with incorrectly applied SPF insulation and can be addressed by either correcting the areas of miss-applied foam or by removing and re-insulating the areas. Miss-Applied includes improper ventilation during the application, incomplete application, off ratio application, and also includes the SPF in direct contact with recessed can lights in the attic, keyless light fixtures bulbs, dryer vents, and/or chimney flues, all of which can heat the SPF and cause a tremendous amount of chemical odors.


Category 1 is relatively cut and dry and requires the onsite inspection of the SPF and the collection of no air samples.  The inspection of the foam and the determination of correct and complete installation is a critical first step.


I‘ve been on SPF insulation investigations where other Indoor Environmental Professionals (IEP’s) who were hired to assess the SPF insulation never looked at the SPF insulation.  Most have no knowledge of how to assess the correct or complete installation of the SPF insulation.  Most IEP’s show up with all manner of air sampling equipment and begin and end their investigation with the collection of air samples intending to identify the chemical signature of miss-applied SPF insulation.  But that’s just not going to happen.


For all who want to conduct SPF insulation inspections, start with understanding what correct and complete installation is according to the manufacturer who produced the foam you are inspecting.


Below is an example of a home with retro-fit SPF insulation installed in the attic.  The homeowners hired an IEP to help establish and/or confirm that the SPF insulation was making them sick.  The home was traditionally ventilated with a large rear lanai.   As with typical SPF insulation landscape fabric was used to separate the lanai attic from the sealed SPF insulation attic.  However, the large Lanai attic space was not properly ventilated as shown in Diagram 1.

IAQS  #IAQS

The lanai had soffit vents and no off ridge vents hence the incomplete attic ventilation.  The outdoor air pressure (wind) was moving the hot humid Florida air into the attic and into the sealed SPF insulation attic through the landscape fabric and SPF insulation as shown in Diagram 3.  The moisture was supporting microbial growth that was the actual odor identified within the home.  The correction was to first relieve the lanai attic pressure by installing an off ridge vent as shown in Diagram 2 and then by removing and replacing the mold damaged SPF insulation.

IAQS

Unfortunately, thousands of dollars were spent on the hunt for the infamous miss-applied chemical signature of the off-gassing SPF insulation.  Of course to no avail.  This is just one example of the easily overlooked yet painfully obvious issues with incomplete or incorrect SPF insulation.

The second category – Category 2 pre-existing or recently introduced contributors


This category cannot be stress enough to the professionals that are investigating SPFI.  This category runs the gamut and can include some rather odd contributors to occupant discomfort and nuisance odors that become much more concentrated when the SPFI is installed.   These include the HVAC system, air exchange rate, storage of materials in the now sealed space, insect and or rodent activity, routine pest control applications, the previous insulation condition and material, proper ducting of kitchen and bath fans.  The possibilities are endless and all must be considered.  Remember that what has accumulated in the attic is now semi-conditioned air that is shared with the attic and living space of the home.


For example if the home is a 60 year old ranch that had open cell SPFI installed at the roof sheathing and the attic was not cleaned to help save a few bucks, the bath fans are ducted to the attic space, and the home once had a rodent issue that was treated with poisons.  Well to say the least you have a huge list of contributors to occupant discomfort and nuisance odors.  Most of the SPF insulation investigations I am called in to review all of these issues were overlooked simply because of the recent application of SPFI.


It’s not necessarily the SPF insulation that is producing the odor or contaminate that is causing occupant discomfort but the SPF insulation is what eliminated the natural ventilation of the attic which prevented the odors and contaminants from entering the home.  The SPF insulation has now trapped the odors and contaminants within the semi-conditioned space.


In this case, the home also had no outdoor air and the home was accumulating VOC’s from daily use products.


The home was blower-door tested and didn’t even come close to the minimum ASHRAE air exchange rate. That attic air is now a part of the occupied space as semi-conditioned space and has 60 years of accumulated who knows what.  Easily it could include the accumulation of dust, debris, fiberglass, rodent and insect activity, prior application of pesticides, maybe even vermiculite.


This is a huge aspect of an SPF insulation investigation that I find all too often overlooked. As a professional investigating SPF insulation you have to ask questions beyond the obvious who was the demon SPF insulation manufacturer.


You have to ask relevant questions such as;

  • “What is the condition of the new semi-conditioned space?”
  • “What have the occupants been sealed in with?”
  • “How is the air exchange rate being met?”
  • “How is the semi-conditioned space actually being semi-conditioned?”


Sometimes it’s best to keep it simple, particles, pathway, and pressure.  Remember to keep an opened mind; it’s not always the SPF insulation.


On a retrofit SPF insulation investigation where there was an odor described as rotten eggs or sulfur the home owner hired an IEP to help establish that the SPF insulation was making them sick.  The IEP’s hired to find the odor focused on TO-15 sample collection throughout the home.  They were confident they identified the miss-applied SPF insulation chemical signature.


Not quite. Just under $5,000 later it was determined that the samples identified a chemical cocktail that could have been the result of just about everything used within the home over the last year since the SPF insulation was applied.  With no outdoor air supply and poor ventilation the VOC’s created within the home stayed in the home.  What the IEP’s didn’t notice was a failed air admittance valve in the attic over the area where the odor was the strongest.  At a cost of twenty bucks for a new air admittance valve the odor was eliminated.


On a new construction SPF insulation investigation, the IEP’s hired to establish that the SPF insulation was making the homeowners sick once again set up the VOC sample collection center and collected four TO-15 8 hour summa canisters and 8 sorbent tubes from a single story 2,200 square foot home.


The homeowners reported that after about a year the home began to make them feel worse when home than when away.  The culprit in their mind was the SPF insulation.  When I asked them how they came to that conclusion they said Google. They then hire an IEP to help them prove to the builder that the SPF insulation was making them sick.


As the IEP was setting up their summa canisters, I began my investigation that started with the condition and settings of the homes ventilation system.  I knew the home had outdoor air supply.  I simply wanted to determine the thermostat and Aprilaire settings and establish the amount of outdoor air being supplied to the home.  As shown in the photo the Aprilaire ventilation controller was set to “Off”.

IAQS

When the 8 hour sampling period was over and the IEP was collecting their equipment I cranked up the AC and opened the Aprilaire ventilator to 30 minutes per cycle. During the sampling period of 8 hours the carbon dioxide levels were measured above 2000 ppm and the tVOC’s were measured at a mere 700 to 800 ppb.  After 1 hour of proper ventilation the carbon dioxide and tVOC levels were reduced by more than 50%. Amazingly the issue proved to be accumulation and not production of VOC’s.  Once again a complete investigation identified an issue with the ventilation that was misdiagnosed as SPF insulation.


On another SPF insulation investigation were the homeowner had spent thousands on sampling with an IEP who felt he had established the connection between the SPF and the occupant symptoms.  Again review by the PhD’s and chemist found no such connection that could be corroborated.  However the interview found that the homeowner was in the second floor master bedroom during the application of the SPF insulation.  The access to the attic was in the master closet, nice.  The applicator didn’t want to use landscape fabric to separate the large covered second story balcony just outside of the master bedroom so the applicator just applied the SPF insulation to the ceiling of the balcony.

IAQS

The photos above show two of the nine recessed can light fixtures that were covered in the foam from completely covered to just shy of completely covered.  The homeowner liked to sit outside in the evening and look out over the lake.  However, he reported that he could no longer spend the evenings on his beloved balcony because he was so sensitive to the SPF insulation. Yes he had become sensitized to the SPF insulation because he was in the home during the application but the trigger or catalyst to the odor was the heating of the SPF insulation just outside his master bedroom and just above his beloved balcony each time he turned on the balcony lights.


Sometimes as IEP’s we are hired to provide a very specific service.  I’ll use mold as an example.  When some IEP’s are hired to provide a mold inspection they often become far too focused on looking for one potential contributor and often overlook the many other and often obvious contributors.  Samples for mold spores are collected and moisture is hunted with a vengeance but not much else is looked at or investigated.   SPF insulation investigations are the same.  Are we hired to help the homeowner identify what in their home may be contributing to their symptoms or are we there to prove their hypothesis that it is or isn’t mold or SPF insulation.


IEP’s often go in with blinders on and lose focus on the true intent of the investigation which in my opinion should be “What is contributing to occupant discomfort and complaint?”   The IEP should approach the home as a system and be open to all potential contributors to occupant complaint.  The chief characteristic that distinguishes the scientific method of investigation from other methods of investigation is that scientists seek to let reality speak for itself, supporting a theory when a theory’s predictions are confirmed and challenging a theory when its predictions prove false.  Scientific investigation is generally intended to be as objective as possible in order to reduce biased interpretations of results. This is often overlooked when the IEP conducts an investigation focused on making the evidence support their hypothesis without objective challenge.


IEP’s must remember that while the SPF insulation may be the issue unless you can say there are no other issues within the home you have not completed your investigation you have just begun.


The third category – Category 3 Sensitization due to exposure


This category includes all occupants who have become sensitized or allergic to the odors given off from SPFI. With sensitization occupants have either re-entered the property shortly after the foam is applied, well before the manufacturer recommended re-occupancy time of 24 to 48 hours while the SPF insulation is still curing and off-gassing, or in the most severe cases of occupant sensitivity the exposure was actually took place during the application of the SPF insulation.


I had one case where the sensitized occupant was also the general contractor that built the home.  During the interview with the owner builder, I asked what he knew as a builder about the SPF insulation.  He admitted to not knowing anything until he began to react to the SPF insulation in his home.  I asked if he had the MSDS to review and he informed me that he did not.  Interesting, I asked if he maintained all of the building material MDS onsite.  He happily sad no that’s up to the subcontractors, interesting.


I then asked him if he was curious as to how the SPF insulation was applied and he of course told me that he was very curious.  He told me that he was in the attic while it was being applied.  Incredible right, you can’t make this up.


I asked if he thought it was odd that the applicator was in full protective equipment with supplied air and he was just watching in street clothes.  I also asked if the contractor told him that he shouldn’t be watching without personal protective equipment.  He told me that the contractor told him that he shouldn’t be up there when it was being applied but it was his house and he was the builder so he was going to do what he wanted.  I asked how long he was up there and he said about 30 minutes and then he began to get a huge headache.  Unbelievable, he was incredibly sensitized to the foam and no amount of miss-applied SPF insulation removal was going to provide him any relief.


Sensitization of the occupants can be a result of many issues such as occupants that don’t want to spend the money for a hotel stay, early re-entry or occupancy, the curious application observer, to the painfully stupid like the builder above.  However occupant sensitization can also be the result of the lack of proper ventilation during the application.  Venting of the off-gassing of the SPF insulation during application is critical and often not conducted at all. In all cases of occupant sensitization that I have been involved with the SPF insulation application was not properly vented to the exterior which created a substantial accumulation of the off-gassing chemicals within the property. These trapped volatile organic chemicals VOC’s are what sensitizes the occupants who have either re-occupied too early or were present during the SPFI application.


Sensitization occurs when the occupants are overexposed to the trapped volatile organic chemicals VOC’s and become sensitized. From that point on, any exposure to even a minute amount of the chemical causes a reaction. The process of sensitization can make a home unlivable for people who become sensitized.


Homes that have improper ventilation during the application process of the SPF insulation are also included in the miss-applied category and almost always have identified areas of miss-applied SPF insulation (SPFI).


This category is unique in that any attempt at reducing the occupant’s exposure to the SPF insulation that they are now sensitized to may not be of any relief.  I have had no luck in providing sensitized occupants relief from the home they are now sensitive to.  I have been involved in everything from the introduction of outdoor air through a pre-filter and dehumidifier to control the temperature, humidity, particles, path, and pressure to full removal of the SPF insulation. Unfortunately that bell can’t be un-rung.


Steps in the Right Direction


SPFA’s The Spray Polyurethane Foam Professional Certification Program (“SPFA PCP”) launched at the SprayFoam 2013 Convention & Expo

IAQS

To become certified under SPFA’s new program, you must pass the exam and meet the criteria for any level of Certification you would like to achieve. It is a progressive program with each level based on the candidate passing the exam for the previous level. In other words, EVERYONE must begin with SPF Assistant criteria. If your ultimate goal is to be a Certified Project Manager, you must meet the requirements for Assistant, then Installer, then Master Installer, then Project Manager to become a Certified SPF Project Manager. http://www.sprayfoam.org/


Connecticut House Bill No. 5908; An act requiring safety and certification standards for the spray foam insulation industry


ASTM WK30960 is intended to establish safe re-entry times for occupants following spray polyurethane foam insulation application.


ASTM WK30960 - New Practice for Spraying, Sampling, and Packaging Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Insulation Samples for Environmental Chamber Emissions Testing


The CAN/ULC S705.1 National Standard requires that the spray polyurethane foam material be installed in accordance with the CAN/ULC S705.2 standard for Thermal insulation – Spray applied rigid polyurethane foam, medium density – Application.


The CAN/ULC S705.2 Application Standard lists a number of requirements for the manufacturer (seller of the two liquid components), the contractor (the corporation who has the contract to perform the installation) and the installer (the worker who actually sprays the components to form spray polyurethane foam on the job site).


The CAN/ULC S705.2 Application Standard sets forth requirements for environmental conditions suitable for spraying, substrate requirements, installation requirements, daily testing of the installed products and documentation requirements.


The Licensed Contractor is required to use applicators that are trained and certified under the SPF Quality Assurance Program used by CUFCA. Each installer is issued a plastic photo-identification card every July 1. The installer is required to carry this card with him during the complete installation period.



John P. Lapotaire, CIEC
Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant
Indoor Air Quality Solutions, IAQS
Microshield Environmental Services, LLC
Certification by American Council for Accredited Certification ACAC CIEC #0711048
Council-certified Environmental Thermography Consultant ACAC CETC #1005013
Accreditation by Council for Engineering and Scientific Specialty Boards (CESB)
Florida State License Mold Assessor MRSA #4

www.FloridaIAQ.com



 

Add a Comment

(Enter the numbers shown in the above image)


Follow jlapotaire on Twitter


Review microshield-es.com on alexa.com
   

[Valid RSS]
Add this Content to Your Site
   


Latest Top (12) News


EPISODE468 - Flashback Friday - Joseph Ponessa, PhD, MS


Fri, 14 Jul 2017 12:00:15 -0400


EPISODE467 - Flashback Friday - Major L. Long - Fire Restoration Pioneer
Join us as we go back in time and discuss the early days of the disaster restoration field with industry pioneer Major Long. Major was one of the first disaster restoration practitioners. Major Long, CR is a past president of the RIA (1978-1980) and also served a term as the association's disaster restoration technical director. Don't miss this opportunity to hear from one of the early innovators in the field of disaster restoration field.

Fri, 07 Jul 2017 12:00:06 -0400


EPISODE466 - Flashback Friday to episode 456
Pete Consigli, CR, WLS; Ken Larsen, CR, WLS, CMP ; Peter Crosa, AIC, RPA and Ed Cross, Esq â??Restoration Contractors of the Future: Will they Get a Spine or be Rolled Over?â??

Fri, 30 Jun 2017 12:00:37 -0400


EPISODE465 - Nuno Canha, PhD - University of Lisbon - IAQ and Ventilation
This week on IAQ Radio we welcome another international researcher from the University of Lisbon Nuno Canha, PhD. Dr. Canha recently published a paper "Indoor air quality during sleep under different ventilation patterns". This is a topic we have been interested in but there has not been much research to discuss. We look forward to talking about this paper and and other research Dr. Canha has done related to IAQ issues. Dr. Canha holds a MSc in Chemistry from Instituto Superior Tecnico of University of Lisbon, Portugal, and completed a PhD degree in Environmental Sciences in Delft University of Technology (Delft, The Netherlands) in 2014. His main research interests are instrumental neutron activation analysis, indoor air quality, source apportionment, ventilation rates, atmospheric air quality, exposure to air pollutants and biomonitoring of air pollution with lichens. Join us live today at noon or download the show later to LEARN MORE on IAQ Radio!

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 12:00:06 -0400


EPISODE464 - Live from the Violand Executive Summit!
We are back at the annual Violand Executive Summit and have lined up a great cast of restoration veterans and up and comers to discuss the topic "Restoration a Changing Industry". 2017 marks the 30th anniversary for Violand Management Associates, who during that time, has grown to become a leading Advisory Services firm in the restoration and cleaning industries. In the spirit of watching a company like Violand Management grow and develop over three decades, we thought it would be fun to explore how the restoration industry itself has changed during that time, sometimes for the good and sometimes for the not so good. We also plan to explore what this group feels are the potential future opportunities and where the industry is going. To help us do that, we have asked a group of Violand Executive Summit participants to help us out and have assembled a talented group of industry veterans and savvy rising stars in restoration. It's great to be back at the Violand Executive Summit! The Veterans Lee King -President After Disaster and current RIA Board of Directors member Wes Williams - Founder and President CJB in the Vancouver BC Scott Stamper - CEO Regency DKI and past RIA president Tom Laska - President ICC Restoration Minneapolis, MN The Next Generation of Leaders Chris Yanker - Production Manager Buffalo Restoration in Bozeman, MT Jacelyn Carpenter - CEO Ideal Restoration, San Francisco, CA and RIA board member Grant Nitzche - President SERVPRO of Wheaton, IL Tom McMahon - Senior Project Manager McMahon Restoration Chicago, IL

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 12:00:14 -0400


EPISODE463 - Flashback Friday - Martin L. King, ASA, CR
This week we flashback to a show from 3-28-2008 with Martin L. King, ASA, CR. Unfortunately Mr. King is no longer with us but we feel blessed to have this interview with him. We have cleaned up some audio issues and are thrilled that this fantastic interview will live on many years to come. We are proud to have done this interview and plan on dedicating quite a few future Flashback Fridayâ??s to shows with industry leaders that are unfortunately no longer with us, this is the first in that series. Martin King, ASA, CR was the Restoration Industries Association Technical Adviser for 30 years, where he developed a broad range of restoration procedures and published over 300 articles in trade journals. As the CEO of Martin Churchill Associates, Inc. Damage Investigators and Appraisers Mr. King also investigated and prepared formal reports on over 2000 property damage cases. Marty also taught at the University of Maryland in the Fire Sciences group. Mr. King was the man disaster restoration people went to when nobody else could answer their questions. Donâ??t miss this rare opportunity to hear the â??Dean of Disaster Restorationâ??. Also joining us on this show was The â??Restoration Industries Global Watchdogâ?? Pete Consigli and our Technical Director, Dr. Dietrich Weyel.

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 11:59:45 -0400


EPISODE462 - Larry Zarker, CEO BPI & Joe Medosch, Independent Trainer
This week on IAQ Radio we explore a new credential from the home performance world that is directly related to indoor environmental quality. The Building Performance Institute, has recently established the Healthy Home Evaluator credential to add to their list of credentials available. We look forward to talking about this and other home performance community trends with Larry Zarker and Joe Medosch. Larry Zarker is the CEO of the Building Performance Institute, the professional standards setting and credentialing organization for both the weatherization and home performance contracting industries. He oversees BPI's national network of over 12,000 certified professionals and BPI GoldStar contracting companies. He helped found and served on the Board of Directors of Efficiency First, the trade association for America's home performance workforce. Prior to BPI, he worked for nearly twenty years with the NAHB Research Center and was the Vice President of Marketing for over a decade, serving both the new home and remodeling sectors with innovative product development and research. Joe Medosch - Owner of Energy & Environmental Consulting, LLC and Executive Director of Healthy Home Environment Association. He participated in the development of the BPI HHE credential and is a Healthy Homes Master Trainer. His certifications include: BPI Proctor - Building Analyst & Envelope Professional, Healthy Home Evaluator, Infiltration & Duct Leakage, ICC- Commercial & Residential Energy Inspector / Plans Examiner and Residential Building Inspector.

Fri, 02 Jun 2017 11:59:43 -0400


EPISODE461 - FLASHBACK FRIDAY! Richard Corsi, PhD. of Texas, Austin
This week we flashback to a show from 9-26-14 with Richard Corsi, PhD. We had a great series with Dr. Corsi and several of his students. We called the series Research to Practice. This show set up the next three we did with him and his students. It was a great discussion of the challenges and opportunitiescoming for the IAQ world. Richard Corsi, PhD is the Chair & ECH Bantel Professor for Professional Practice Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. He earned his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of California at Davis in 1989. He joined the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin in 1994. Dr. Corsi researches indoor air quality, including sources and control of indoor air pollution and human exposure to indoor toxins. He has also studied how architectural materials can remove chemicals from building air, offering protection for occupants following terrorist attacks.

Fri, 26 May 2017 12:00:12 -0400


EPISODE460 - Rachel Gutter - What is a WELL Building Standard?
This week on IAQ Radio we welcome Rachel Gutter, Chief Product Officer for the International WELL Building Institute. Ms. Gutter joined the International WELL Building Institute in late 2016 as senior vice president, bringing with her a wealth of cross-cutting experience in safer, healthier environments where they matter the most: in school rooms across the globe. She joins IWBI after a nine-year career at the U.S. Green Building Council, where she founded the Center for Green Schools, convening and collaborating with a diverse group of partners, including teachers unions, the National PTA, the Department of Education, the Princeton Review, executives from Fortune 100 companies, and green building councils around the world. Under her direction, the Center published more than 1,000 pages of technical guides and original research, mobilized more than $275 billion in investments in LEED certified educational facilities, and deployed more than half a million volunteers to contribute $50 million in donated time to transform schools and campuses on every continent. In her current role she is helping the International WELL Building Institute continue their development and implementation of the WELL Building Standards. According to the Institute this is the first standard of its kind that focuses solely on the health and wellness of building occupants. WELL identifies 100 performance metrics, design strategies, and policies that can be implemented by the owners, designers, engineers, contractors, users and operators of a building. It is based on a thorough review of the existing research on the effects of spaces on individuals and has been advanced through a thorough scientific and technical review. In order to achieve the requirements of the WELL Building Standard, the space must undergo a process that includes an on-site assessment and performance testing by a third party. Overall, the WELL Building Standard is designed to comprehensively cover the various individual needs of building occupants while also building a common foundation for measuring wellness in the built environment.

Fri, 19 May 2017 11:59:42 -0400


EPISODE459 - FLASHBACK FRIDAY - Episode 435 - William Fisk
This week we flashback to a show from 10-28-16 with William Fisk. This is an interview we have been trying to line up for quite some time and its exciting to have this research giant join us live for the hour. Few have contributed as much to our knowledge of IAQ as Bill and his group at LBL. We look forward to discussing how that research can be better used in practice with the Leader of the LBL Indoor Environment Group. Mr. Fisk is a Sr. Scientist (mechanical engineer) and is the leader of the Indoor Environment Group. He has more than 30 years of experience in research on the interrelated issues of building energy performance, ventilation, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and occupant health and performance. His research focuses primarily on energy efficient methods of maintaining and improving ventilation and IEQ in commercial buildings and on quantifying the impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He is a fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the Academy of Indoor Air Sciences, and he serves on the editorial board for Indoor Air Journal. He is an author of approximately 100 refereed archival journal articles or book chapters. He has BS and MS degrees in Mechanical Engineering.

Fri, 12 May 2017 12:01:24 -0400


EPISODE458 - Ed Light - EnLightening New AIHA White Paper on VOC Criteria
Mr. Light holds degrees in Environmental Science from the University of Massachusetts (B.S.) and Marshall University (M.S.), is a Senior Fellow of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, has authored over 40 scientific publications on assessment and control of the indoor environment and has chaired several national scientific committees. In the 1980s, Ed established the West Virginia Department of Health IAQ Program, pioneering efforts to resolve exposure issues related to formaldehyde, asbestos, and termiticides. In the 1990s, he developed widely used protocols for addressing IEQ complaints (published by EPA, NIOSH and ISIAQ) and managing air quality in occupied buildings under construction (for SMACNA, promulgated by ANSI). As a consultant, Ed has directed more than 1000 multi-disciplinary IEQ investigations, ranging from the White House to the South Pole Station. He has been admitted in numerous proceedings as a litigation expert in industrial hygiene.

Fri, 05 May 2017 12:00:03 -0400


EPISODE000 - IICRC Show Cancelled with Pete Duncanson


Fri, 28 Apr 2017 12:00:26 -0400
Follow Microshields IAQ News and Headlines Bloglines RSS Feed

Subscribe with Bloglines

 



IAQ News and Articles

Latest Top (10) News
http://recordings.talkshoe.com/rss1547.xml